Grace in a Little White Pill

Grace in a Little White Pill ~ thisfelicitouslife.wordpress.com

I’m sharing some of my experience with postpartum anxiety and depression as part of a Blog Hop sponsored by my friend Katherine at Half-Kindled.  I’ve written a little bit about it before (here and here).  It’s a topic that is still hard for many people to talk about, and I’m convinced the more we remove the shame and the taboo of talking about postpartum (and other forms of) depression and anxiety, the more we can help each other.

After I had my first baby, I didn’t experience the typical symptoms you see in literature about postpartum depression.  I wasn’t sad so much as angry and irritable and frustrated all the time.  I was angry at everyone, and then I felt a lot of self-loathing for being such a (seemingly) terrible person.  Thank God, I never came close to harming my child, but my marriage suffered, as did various items around that house that I kicked during angry outbursts.

It took me eight months to talk to my doctor about it.  He actually recognized warning signs of postpartum depression right after I gave birth: I was sobbing–apparently that’s not normal!  “No, no,” I insisted, “I’m just tired.”

And so it went for months of denial.  Two things in particular kept me from seeking treatment:

1. My symptoms weren’t typical of postpartum depression.  In fact, they were symptoms I had dealt with all my life, on and off, to some degree: anger, frustration, and irritability interspersed with self-loathing.  Before having children, I was always able to push through somehow. The hormonal havoc and sleep deprivation that came having a baby just made the symptoms worse.  I wasn’t able to push through and function normally anymore.

2. The second and biggest roadblock to wellness for me was that I felt I didn’t deserve help.  I was never psychotic.  I never lost my reason.  I always had some degree of control of my actions.  Therefore, I thought, I just needed to try harder. Taking medication was the easy route that I didn’t deserve because I hadn’t tried hard enough on my own.

I attribute this to the Act of Contrition I learned growing up.  There really is such a thing as too much Catholic guilt! The line goes, “I firmly resolve, with the help of Thy grace, to sin no more . . . .”  My understanding was, as long as there was some possibility that I could improve in the future, my failing was my fault, and I needed to just try harder.  “With the help of Thy grace,” is in there too of course, but I didn’t think much about how God’s grace could help me.  It just served as a reminder that I needed to pray harder.

The game changer was that now I had a family who suffered every time that (surprise!) my white-knuckling failed.  Thank God it became clear to me that I had to take the “easy route,” even if I didn’t deserve it, because they deserved it.

One form of the “help of God’s grace,” for me, is a little white pill.

Eight months after having my first baby, I started taking an anti-depressant, and it helped almost immediately.  At first I worried it would alter my personality, but now I truly feel that the medication helps me be my true self, the person God made me to be but that I couldn’t be under the weight of anxiety.

Throughout the years, I’ve tried going off antidepressants, but it’s never worked.  Unfortunately, whatever condition I have is not solely a postpartum one.  It just took the strain of having a baby to reveal a problem that hovered below the surface.

I don’t like the idea of taking a pill every day.  It has made me gain weight.  It’s made me sluggish.  I’m not the type-A super achiever I used to be.  I’m sure there’s some underlying hormonal imbalance or other health problem that is affecting my mental state, and I’d like eventually to figure that out.  But for now, medication is the only way I can be the loving, patient, happy wife and mother I need to be.

And that’s been the grace of the little white pill for me: it has forced me to focus on what God really wants me to do and the humility to realize that I can’t do it on my own power.

He isn’t calling me to be a super achiever.  He isn’t asking me to keep a squeaky clean house or volunteer on a dozen committees or work full time or even cook delicious meals.  All he asks me to do is love–love my husband, love my children.

To paraphrase a popular slogan, “I have one job.”

Before taking an antidepressant, I had enough nervous energy to do more things, but I was angry, bitter, and irritable most of the time with my husband and children.

Now, I don’t have as much energy and drive, but I have the underlying peace and calm I need to love my family better. It’s humbling to accept that I need medicine to fulfill the most basic requirements of my life.  That humility, too, is a grace.

Antidepressants are not right for everyone, but if you’re really suffering I’d beg you to consider it.

For all of us though, there’s truth in the saying, “Let go and let God.”  I  want to challenge everyone reading this to be open-minded about the ways you can “let God.”

God probably will not supernaturally transfuse you with peace and patience.

He might offer it to you in a pill.  (I think of Lexapro as my “patience in a pill!”)

He might offer you grace in the form of therapy with a psychologist of other professional counselor.

He might offer you grace through your helpful husband, if you would only overlook the way he loads the dishwasher incorrectly and doesn’t separate darks and whites.

He might offer you grace in the form of a friend’s offer to watch your kids, an offer you normally brush aside.

He might offer you grace when you let go of self-imposed standards for how you keep house or how many hours you work or how busy you keep your schedule.

Our calling is not to try hard and do hard things; our calling is to love.  And often we can’t love the way we ought until we stop trying so hard to do it ourselves.

Hope for the Future 2

For more on this topic, hop over to

Katherine at Half Kindled,

Bonnie at A Knotted Life

Jenna at Call Her Happy

Jenny at Mama Needs Coffee, and

Rosie at Check Out That Sunset.

Grace in a Little White Pill ~ thisfelicitouslife.wordpress.com

Do Your Kids Dress Themselves? {What We Wore Sunday}

Mine do.  I never thought I’d let them, but now I do.

It occurred to me that what they wear these days is much more interesting than anything I wear.

So this is what I wore yesterday to church–nothing worth blogging about really.  (Girl 1 pleaded, “Mommy, you have to wear a dress!  If you wear those pants–the priest is going to be mad at you!”  (He wasn’t.)).

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My Estiva ballet flats from Crocs are still holding strong (n.b. they run large).

Fact of the week you don’t need to know: I haven’t plucked my eyebrows, seriously, in months.  They’re not so tidy looking close-up but they’re not exactly out of control.  I may never go back.

This is what Girl 1 wore (Girl 2 already had changed by the time I took pictures):

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Girl 2 wore this Friday morning while we ran errands–look carefully and you can see a floral sundress she wore under her Frozen dress:

IMG_8643She insisted on changing into her “picnic clothes” and “picnic shoes” later that afternoon before we went to an end-of-the-year school picnic at the playground.

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I probably shouldn’t let her wear these shoes to the playground anymore.  But my sister went through a stage, at around the same age, of wearing dress-up high heel everyday, everywhere.  So there’s some nostalgia there for me.  My parents even let her wear them to church.  At our current parish, children aren’t the novelty they were at my parish growing up.  So letting your kid wear loud, clackety-clack shoes to church is like–ten demerits!  So we draw the line at wearing them church.

I hope you all are enjoying a lovely Memorial Day.  Click on over to Fine Linen and Purple for more What I Wore Sunday posts.

In more somber news, I’m participating this Wednesday in a blog-hop on maternal anxiety and depression, hosted by Katherine at Half-Kindled.  A bevy of talented bloggers are participating and writing on this important topic, including Bonnie at A Knotted Life, Jenna of Call Her Happy, Jenny of Mama Needs Coffee, and Rosie of Check Out That Sunset, so you should definitely check it out!

Friday link love

Some serious, most not . . . .

I’m coming across news articles and little tidbits I want to discuss with you, but I never remember them. . . . Until now.  I really hope these links work.  Let me know if they don’t work.

1. This article is about a young woman who was diagnosed with autism at age 21. **The Wall Street Journal link isn’t working–here’s another article about the same person**   Because she was “high functioning,” it took until college for someone to figure out what was going on.  She describes feeling relieved at the diagnosis, because she no longer feels a need to strain to be normal.  . . . With all her quirks, I wonder if Girl 1 might be on the spectrum somewhere.  But other times, I see how easily she interacts with other kids and think, “Nah.”  Anyway, it’s something I’ll keep in mind.  It’s a tricky thing because of course I don’t want my kid to have autism, but I want her to have all the resources she can. . . . AT the same time, with 1 in 68 people having autism, is it really a disorder?  Or, at higher-functioning levels is it more a personality type?  And does that distinction matter?

2.. Ann Taylor is being bought out by the company that owns DressBarn.  Weird.  I like reading the Wall Street Journal business section from time to time because it’s fun to learn what’s going on behind the scenes at stores where I shop.  (The full text of the WSJ article isn’t available online, so I’m linking to a different article.)

3. The percentage of African-Americans in law enforcement has remained flat since 2007.  With this and all the related news about the Baltimore riots, etc. etc. . . . it’s so frustrating . . . It’s like no one cares about black men until they get shot by the police.   So many black young people–males especially–are on a life course that’s fundamentally at odds with the law.  And it happens in childhood and many barely have a choice.   And all the hiring quotas and body cameras and police training and whatnot in the world isn’t going to change that.  There’s going to be a tension between young black men and the law so long as so many of them have no real lawful options in life.  Could someone out there talk about this please?

4. On a lighter note, I’m thinking a lot about moving soon and what I’ll do differently.  When I arrange and set up and decorate whatever our next house is, I’m focusing on furniture and window coverings, then rugs and wall hangings, and only after that all the knickknacks.  With the current house, I’ve constantly moved mantle decorations and pictures around, never getting the result I wanted because my curtains and furniture sucked.  . ..  Anyway, I was thinking about all this and then later that day I read a post from The Nester on the exact same point.  . . .This stuff doesn’t come naturally to me but I’m learning! . . . Still, the Nester decorates with a lot more knickknacks than I prefer.  Her pictures make me feel a little crowded.

5. A year or two ago I polled you guys about flesh-toned pantyhose.  Guess what?  They’re officially “back.” Ellen called it: Princess Kate can do no sartorial wrong.

6. I am loving, loving the Bossa Nova station on Pandora.  It’s soothing and at the same time it makes me feel like I’m in an Audrey Hepburn movie.

7. Click over to Kelly at This Ain’t the Lyceum for more quick takes.  Happy weekend!

P.S.  Girl 1 just informed me, “When I grow up I’m going to have five twins!  . . . Their names are going to be Carlos, Carlos, Peg, and Meg!”

Sushi and Speedblogging

I think the only way to get out of this writing slump I’m in is to get back to writing whatever’s on the top of my head.

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{Here I’m tempted to insert some sort of apology but watch me resist!}

Here’s the girls’ and my dinner from tonight.

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Of course I’m being snarky and reverse-snobbish because it’s like the worst-looking food photography ever.  But I enjoyed it–just discovered I can get a bunch of freshly-made sushi rolls from a local restaurant for under $10.  The girls didn’t want to try it.  Their loss. (They got cheese roll-ups, black olives, tortilla chips and cheese dip.)  I can’t tell you how much self-control it took to leave half 8/18ths of the rolls for Pat.

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Just realized that paragraph made it sound like all I had for dinner was 10 California rolls.

OMG y’all!  I’m such a pig!  I just ate ten sushi rolls!  #sorrynotsorry  #oink  Extra burpees for me at the box tomorrow!  5:30 a.m. can’t come soon enough!

Not.

That absolutely is not the case.

In other news, I let a Kirby saleswoman into the house yesterday.  I’m a sucker for offers of a free floor-cleaning.  Two awkward hours later, I resisted the sales pitch and my floors were a lot cleaner.  It convinced me I should get a new vacuum cleaner.  I’m just not going to spend four figures on it.  . . . I used to get all optimistic whenever I saw a cleaning product demonstration.  “Maybe if I just get the right product, I’ll do more cleaning.”  Fortunately, I learned my lesson with the $100 Norwex mop, leaving me wiser and prepared when the $3,000 wonder-vac came to my door.

Also, the girls and I had a nice playground outing this afternoon.  The weather is lovely today.

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Have a lovely Wednesday evening.  The work week is halfway over!

What I’ve Been Reading Lately: 7 Quick Book Reviews

Let’s see if I can finish this before the three-year-old wakes from her nap:

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1. The Scent of Water by Elizabeth Goudge: I keep hearing about Elizabeth Goudge. She has a devoted following.  Her books mostly went out of print but are now back in print.  Sadly, I’m not a fan.  She develops some lovely themes of redemptive suffering and the working of grace, but she has a wordy, sentimental style I’m not fond of.

2. Growing Up With Sensory Issues: Insider Tips from a Woman with Autism: I really appreciated this first-hand account of growing up with sensory processing disorder and autism/Aspergers.  I’ve read a lot of books on similar topics, so I just skimmed it but I might go back.  I especially liked her accounts of what worked for her (her parents’ tough love mixed with lots of understanding) and what didn’t (a lot in the conventional classroom).

3: Quirky Kids: Understanding and Helping Your Child Who Doesn’t Fit In- When to Worry and When Not to Worry:  The title is misleading.  It sounds like it’s about kids who are quirky but without a diagnosable condition.  Actually, it focuses mainly on kids who are on the autism spectrum, although it doesn’t completely ignore those who don’t have a diagnosis.  Again, I skimmed because a lot of books on this topic cover the same material.  But the one page on picky eating made the book for me: basically, don’t make a big to-do over your quirky child’s eating preferences, they’ll probably do just fine no matter how self-limited their diet; you have bigger issues to deal with.

4. It Starts With Food by Dallas and Melissa Hartwig: I keep hearing about Whole 30, and this is the book that started it.  I find the authors’ writing style condescending (“We’ll keep the science-y stuff to a minimum,” . . . because I’m too dumb to understand it??? . . . I hate having my intelligence insulted.)  And yet . . . I found it compelling.  I haven’t done a Whole 30 yet for reasons I won’t go into now, but I’m inclined to try in the near future.  I ate almost-paleo for a few weeks and was surprised at how much I liked it.  Also . . . white potatoes now are allowed!  This makes a world of difference to me.

5. The Little Lady Agency by Hester Browne: This was fun, easy reading.  Total chick lit.  I got bored with the sequel though.  The premise of the first is just original enough to keep me interested but the second felt formulaic from the get-go.

6. Death Comes to the Archbishop, by Willa Cather: So beautiful.  It’s not really about anyone’s death, it’s about a missionary priest–eventual archbishop’s–life, told in a series of short stories about incidents in his life throughout the years.  I wish I could think of a way to make the topic more interesting–as it is, I never would have picked it up if it hadn’t been chosen for book club–but it’s really beautiful and exciting too.  For those who have read it–I almost think the real protagonist is Fr. Joseph, and not the archbishop.  It’s kind of like Fr Joseph’s story is told through the archbishop’s story.  At least, I found Father Joseph a lot more personally likable and colorful than the archbishop.  What do you think?

7. A Handful of Dust, by Evelyn Waugh:  I read this years ago, but just discovered it’s a selection of the month for the Wall Street Journal book club.  I’ll following along because I think Waugh’s writing is brilliant, this book included.  To quote the Wall Street Journal article on it,

What they’re talking about is this end of civilization, or the end of a certain kind of civilization. He’s saying it’s all falling apart. These people are losing whatever heritage they’ve ever had. But there’s a subtext where he’s saying: And didn’t they have it coming? These are frivolous, morally groundless people, who are careless about their privilege, careless about each other and careless about society. And they need some moral underpinning that they don’t now have.

The character’s are ridiculous enough to make you laugh, but their faults are realistic enough to make you cringe.  The ending is just wonderfully over the top.  It’s great satire.

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Girl 2 is waking up.  Gotta go.  Click over to Kelly of This Ain’t the Lyceum for more quick take posts and click over to Modern Mrs. Darcy for more quick lit (she’s finally posting about books she doesn’t like and why she doesn’t).

What We Wore Sunday

Plus thoughts on the Latin Mass and Lilly Pulitzer:

The past two Sundays, we’ve taken very seriously the idea of Sunday as a day of rest.  One parent gets up with the girls while the other sleeps in, then when the sleeper-in parent awakes, the other parent goes back to bed for a nap.  When we’re both up, we all take our time eating lunch and getting ready for the afternoon Spanish mass.  It feels more pious to get up and go to Mass early, but I tell you what–the past two Sundays have been very restorative.   (So much so that I’m up on  monday morning typing this before 7 a.m.)

I don’t love going to Mass in Spanish, but our parish is funny.  If you don’t make it to Mass by 8:30 a.m., your choices are two Latin masses and the Spanish mass.

We never make it to 8:30.

Latin is the universal language of the Church, etc. etc. but if my kids go to any other Catholic church anywhere in the country, there’s a 99% chance Mass is going to be in English, and they’re not going to know the responses.  still don’t know all the new translation responses by heart.  It’s embarrassing.  . . . Well, maybe there’s a 90% chance Mass at any other parish will be in English, and 9% chance it will be in Spanish.  So going to the Spanish mass has its advantages, I guess.  Anyway, as long as 1:30-3:30 a.m. remain the waking/witching/bitching hours in our house, early Mass is not an option.

So anyway, here’s what I wore—a dress I got in my first Stitch Fix.

  
Here’s what the girls wore:  

     I’ve watched with some interest the Target/Lilly Pulitzer collection, and the response thereto.  (I may even have grabbed a few items left on Target’s racks for resale on an inflated price on eBay.  Maybe.  I’ll never tell.)

I’ve had a mild fascination with Lilly P. for a long time.  Ever since I heard about it from a fellow law student during a summer internship.  She was from a totally different social echelon than I and she did not hide the fact.  We were discussing this hoity toity party we’d both been to and she was like, “I was surprised there weren’t more Lilly Pulitzers.”  And I–and another intern of humble lineage–were like “What’s Lilly Pulitzer?”

And she was like, “Oh my God, I can’t believe you haven’t heard of Lilly Pulitzer!”

So Lilly P. seemed to me to represent this whole other type of life–it does–that I don’t really aspire to (I really don’t) but it still fascinates me.  It’s very “other,” as my Mom would say.

And now I dress my girls in it.  Ironically.  From Goodwill and Ebay.  That’s totally normal and healthy.  Right.  But anyway they like it.

I’m linking up with Fine Linen and Purple for What I Wore Sunday (finally!  It’s been so long!).  Have a lovely week!

Blogging conundrums for non-visual types, plus other quick takes

1. I had a couple hours free the other day and I started packing.  Nine boxes full, plus a big bag of stuff to get rid of.  It feelsF1 9.12.12 great!  Now if only we knew when and where we are moving.

2. I attended a blog conference last weekend, thanks to Julie Walsh‘s amazing hospitality and good planning.  It was awesome.  I got to meet blogging friends Julie, Rosie, Lisa, Cristina T., Cristina R., Erica, Mary and Abbey for the first time, and I got to meet new friends too.

3.  Leah Libresco spoke at the conference.  Leah is an atheist-to-Catholic convert who blogs at Unequally Yoked.  Her book was just released yesterday, Arriving At Amen: 7 Catholic Prayers That Even I Can Offer, and I can’t wait to read it.

4. At the conference, Cristina T. spoke about the importance of having Pinterest-friendly images for your posts.  I get a fair number (for me) of hits from Pinterest, even though my graphics are horrible.  I imagine I could get a lot more traffic with a little time invested (though what’s the point of getting more traffic, since this makes me basically no money?  Hmmmm. . . .).  Anyway, every time I play around with making images on PicMonkey or Canva, they look dumb to me.

Like I took half an hour to play around on Canva, and ended up with this.  Maybe it’s okay, I don’t know.  But I couldn’t get it to save correctly (though I just now figured out a work around).  I ran out of time and patience.

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I’ve gotten pretty confident (or at least not self-conscious) with my writing but graphics are a different matter.  The visual arts are just not my strong suit.

F1 9.12.12 v25. Speaking of blogging friends, I also get hits occasionally from kind bloggers who put me on their “blog roll.”  A lot of bloggers have this.  Do you pay much attention to them?

I have a list at the bottom of my blog, consistent of people I know in real life (“IRL”) who happened to have blogs when I started mine.  And I haven’t changed the list since then, even though there are lots more people I know now IRL who have blogs.  Plus I follow, like, 150+ blogs.  But I don’t read each of their posts every time.  So basically I don’t even know where to start with a blog roll.  And what if you put someone on your blog roll but stop reading them; how do you politely take them off?

6. I am digging Carey  Mulligan ‘s no-makeup look on the cover of the current issue of Vogue.

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I’ve been rocking the no-makeup look lately, but Vogue hasn’t come knocking on my door yet.  ;-)

7.  Happy weekend everyone.  Click over to Kelly for more 7 Quick Take posts.

Real Estate Related Brain Dump

Is brain dump a vulgar expression?  It sounds kind of crude to me.  But I wouldn’t know; I was homeschooled.  And anyway, a brain dump is what it is.  But with a real estate motif:

1. We are probably moving, after all.  It’s fun to be looking at houses.  We’ll stay in the same town, preferably in the same neighborhood.  It’s just time for something a little bigger and with a better layout.  And preferably a view!

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2. I’m having some inner turmoil over (hopefully) moving to someplace bigger.  Our main level is 1040 sq ft, with about 750 sq ft of finished basement.  I’m guessing 90% of the people in the world would consider this a HUGE house.  Even in this country a few decades ago, this house would be average for a family our size.  . . . At least once in the recent past, Pat and I said something to the effect of “We’re never moving again.”  We were committed to staying minimal with our possessions in order to fit in our house.  But somewhere along the line it stopped working.  There’s a voice inside telling me I should just try harder to fit into the house we have.  But I tell the voice to shut up.  Plus, the layout of the house is a pain.  No door leading directly into the back yard.  No entry way, poorly-placed doorways and basement stairs.  And a tiny kitchen, which makes cooking healthily from scratch that much harder.  Anyway, that assuages my conscience a bit. . . . Right now I’m already itching to start throwing stuff out and packing because the clutter overflowing in this little house is driving me nuts.  It’s silly because I know that if we get a bigger space we’ll just fill it with more stuff.  *sigh*

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3. We want to rent out our current home, instead of selling it right away.  Current rents are significantly higher than our mortgage payment, so it makes sense to try it out.  But being a landlord is a lot of work, I know, even if your tenants pay.  And if they don’t pay it’s a long process to evict. . . .

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4. What we’re doing first is refinancing our current mortgage, and drawing out some of the equity to use as part of a down payment on the next house.  Because the new loan will be at a lower rate, our monthly payment won’t go up.

5. I cannot tell you how weird it is to be typing this, because we’ve been Dave Ramsey-ish, super debt averse for a long time.  Borrowing more money against the house, instead of paying the mortgage off as fast as possible, and then getting a second mortgage–these are all things I wouldn’t even consider 6 months ago.  I’m not going into all the reasons we’re ready to take more risks, but we think it’ll be okay.

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6. We’ve been watching a lot of HGTV on Netflix (currently–Buying and Selling with the Property Brothers). (I want to play a Property Brothers drinking game sometime–one shot every time someone says “open concept.”)  The question   is–are we watching HGTV because we’re thinking about moving, or are we thinking about moving because we’re watching HGTV?  Hmmm.

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7. Because of all the HGTv watching, I think of more and more things we “should” do before selling our house.  The thing is, our house is worth about half of the lowest-priced houses you’ll ever see on HGTV.  So I wonder how many repairs and improvements would make a difference?  And even if we could get buyers willing to pay more, would they be able to get enough of a mortgage?  We just got the house appraised and I was surprised at how few details the appraisal took into account.  Anyway, if we rent it out we don’t have to worry about that for a while.  We’ll just have to figure out what improvements to do before renting it out.

Anyone have any moving/buying/selling/renting-out experience to share?

Click over to Kelly’s blog for more quick take posts.  Happy weekend!

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Five Consumer Favorites

We are living in a material world, and I (apparently), am a material girl, because I really like . . .

1. Consumer Reports magazine:  I’ve been reading this since I was a kid.  Before each of our car purchases as a married couple, I made Pat join me on a research trip to the library, to scour all the Consumer Reports used car guides.  (Short version: go with Honda or Toyota.)  I also scoured CR before purchasing our home (a foreclosure, sans appliances).  CR failed me on its dishwasher and washing machine recommendations.  Still, I can’t resist seeking out their advice before any major purchase! . . . Yet I’m too cheap to ever buy a subscription!  That really makes no sense, because I read this
stuff for fun.

2. Simcha’s post about why skirts and dresses are just not so cool and comfortable for those of us on the voluptuous side. (Simcha says meaty; I say voluptuous.)  I think this issue was a subconscious reason I postponed jumping on the maxi dress trend for so long.  And I preferred skorts to regular skirts.  But just today I found these (only $12 at Target), and things are looking up.  Or at least, looking, uh, less friction-filled.

3. Speaking of lingerie found at Target, I like this Maidenform slimmer. I wouldn’t mind a bit more compression in the tummy area, but it smoothes all over like a dream (“suddenly skinny!” is promising a bit much though).  I haven’t tried another brand, so I can’t compare, but it’s cheaper than even the Target line of Spanx.  It’s not exactly comfortable enough for all-day wear, but for an evening, it’s fine.  And the gusset works.

4. Stitch Fix people: Thank you Debbie R., Jaime M., Nicola W. and Laura T. (are you the Laura T. who is my cousin-in-law?), all of whom have ordered Stitch Fixes through my referral link, leading to a nice sum of credit in my SF account.  I really hope your SF works for you!  I see now why SF is so popular on blogs.  My blog is fairly small potatoes, but after just one post on the subject, I got four people who ordered through my link (and several more who have signed up but not yet ordered).  I’m guessing much more popular bloggers like, say, Anne Bogel or Emily Freeman get enough SF credit that they never have to pay for clothes!

5. Floradix: On a totally unrelated note–Floradix makes your hair grow!  It did mine, anyway.  A year or so ago, I was losing a postpartum-like quantity of hair, even though my baby was two.  I did some Googling and saw that iron might help.  I’ve always been slightly anemic, but I haven’t been vigilant about taking iron except during pregnancy.  Well, I started taking Floradix on the reg (the equivalent of 10-20 mg of iron a day), and the scary hair loss stopped almost instantly.  I now have annoying little hairs sticking up around my hairline, but that’s new hair, and I’ll take it. Probably any iron supplement would work but Floradix is the only one that doesn’t . . . um . . . clog up my innards.

How many embarrassing things have I discussed so far?  I don’t want to count.  Click over to Rachel‘s blog for much nicer Five Favorite posts.

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or you could just take a nap.

The Tiny Documentary and Unfulfilled Childhood

It’s a little . . . dangerous?  presumptuous?  arrogant? judgmental? . . . yes, judgmental . . . to write about what you think is wrong about someone else.  But if the person made a documentary about himself and publicized it to the world does that make it less bad?  If you think so, you can read my thoughts on the documentary, Tiny: A Story About Living Small over at the Mirror.