Privacy and Mommy Blogging

I’ve written a guest post at The Mirror about privacy issues for mommy bloggers (or any bloggers).  If you’re interested in my thoughts on the matter, you can read them here.  And even if you’re not, you should still check out the rest of The Mirror, a new online publication where women speak about living traditional values in the modern, post-feminist world.  My friends there have published lots of good content and have more coming.  Thank you, Mary, Julie, and Joy for the opportunity to write for you!

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5 thoughts on “Privacy and Mommy Blogging

  1. I liked this article and the reminder that nude pictures/embarrassing stories can be posted anywhere. But I also have to say that I love pictures on mom blogs (for families & friends to view) and think most blog are kind of sterile/boring without a lot of pictures (unless you are a REALLY good writer–which most people are not), so I take a different route of just not “promoting” my blog. So I don’t really do link ups (I’ve done 1 in 3 years), and I don’t worry about the # of followers (because honestly I am happy it is just 10 family & friends I know), and I’ve disabled the ability to find the blog by searching on google … so you have to know the full address to view it (which I share on Christmas cards & my mom shares on facebook). So it would be pretty hard for strangers & pedophiles to find it. I do share my kids names & birthdays & pictures but it is like a live scrapbook that all our out of town relatives LIVE for, so it is totally worth it to be to have a record of all the happy times in our lives. Also, I try never to share the name of our city or that we will be on vacation before we leave for safety reasons.

    • Hi Lauren, It does seem that the risks are much much lower for those who choose not to promote their blogs. The search engine settings alone probably make a big difference. Just as an example, in recent months, about 25% of the hits on my blog have been from search engines, so reducing that traffic would reduce the risk by at least that much.

  2. Pingback: The Duggar Disaster and What Their Real Tragedy Is | This Felicitous Life

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