Weekend Link Love, July 25, 2015: Death Penalty, Rejection, and Parenting

But not all at the same time . . . .

Hello Friends,  Real quick-like, here are a few choice picks from the internet of the past few weeks:

1. Check out this article on how a Mexican drug lord recently succeeded in a meticulously planned prison escape.  It made me think about the death penalty and Catholic Church teaching on it and whether need for the death penalty is really so rare.  In Mexico anyway?  I dunno.

2. I loved this article from Money Saving Mom.  My daughters already have to deal with feeling rejected by other kids from time to time.  I know what it’s like to feel rejected.  I’d give anything to shield them from it, but I can’t.  Crystal discusses how to handle it constructively.  

Honestly, as a mom, I wanted to rush in and scoop them up and protect them. I wanted to express anger and frustration and say things like, “That was so rude and mean… You can never play with those girls ever again!!”

I hurt for them. But I knew deep down in my heart that trying coddle and bubble wrap my kids is doing them a disservice. I cannot shield them from hard things forever.

. . . .

Because there’s a world out there that will crush you in two if you don’t develop backbone, stand strong, know the truth that you’re enough, and lovingly forgive and believe the best about people.

So part of growing up is learning to love others even when they do unloving things to you. It’s forgiving when you are slighted or skipped over — whether intentional or accidental. It’s not harboring bitterness and anger toward people who don’t treat us fairly.

. . . .

I also told the girls that the best remedy for times when you feel lonely and left out is to do something for someone else. Reach out to someone else. Be interested in other people’s lives. Look for ways to serve. Find opportunities to show love.

3. I learned a lot from this article from this Wall Street Journal about the Confederate battle flag brouhaha in South Carolina.  I’ve been seeing a lot more of those flags flying in our town.  I didn’t have a strong opinion on the flag earlier.  My feeling before was, “Just take it down already.”  I have a soft spot for federalism though (or states rights, but that phrase has a negative connotation), and there seemed to be some connection.  I honestly had no idea that the flag was resurrected in the mid-1900s in reaction to the civil rights movement.  And now . . . yeah, seriously, take it down already.

4. On a lighter note, here’s a good resource showing proportionally how much electricity various household items use, and how much energy-saving strategies actually save. It’s something I’ve been thinking about because it looks like we actually will be moving to a bigger house soon, and I’m not looking forward to those utility bills.

5. Remember that singer, Jewel, and her album Pieces of You?  I know some of you remember it.  And that song “Sensitive,” where she whines in her little girl falsetto,

Please be careful with me/ I’m sensitive and I’d like to stay that wa-ay.

Anyway, that makes me roll my eyes and think, “Just get over yourself already.”  But, as Modern Mrs. Darcy explains well, there really is something to “highly sensitive persons” and parenting one is quite a challenge. It’s not so much an issue of having your feelings hurt easily, a la Jewel, but of having overactive physical senses.

6. Speaking of parenting, this funny article by Rob LaZabnik, a writer for the Simpsons, made me laugh: “They’re Back! How to Cope with Returned College Graduates.”

So the time has come for you to cut the cord. And by that I mean: Take your kid off your Netflix account. He will be confused and upset at first, not understanding why this is happening to him, but it’s a great opportunity for him to sign up for something all by himself.

Which brings us to money. It’s finally time to channel your Angela Merkel and get tough with your young Alexis Tsipras.

It also make me think, “No God, please no.”  Also, who is Alexis Tsipras?  I don’t even know, but I still laughed.

7.  Hope you’re having a lovely weekend. Click over to This Ain’t the Lyceum for more quick takes.

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Friday Link Love May 29, 2015: Shoeties and More!

1. Apparently one of the secrets of longevity and health is to . . . eat more beans and walk a lot and live in community. This short article about the living habits of people in areas, like Sardinia, with very high longevity made me want to read the author’s book on the same subject, The Blue Zone Solution: Eating and Living Like the World’s Healthiest People.

It also made me think that our American obsession with diet and exercise is so ridiculous.  Drinking shakes and counting calories and doing workouts are not really hallmarks of a healthy lifestyle.  They’re substitutions that might help–maybe–when we can’t live an actually healthy lifestyle.  (Says me, for whom shakes and the gym would be a huge improvement from the status quo.)

via the Wall Street Journal

2.  This article cracked me up.  The title is No More Ballet Flats: Summer Shoes for Work: Designer Ruthie Davis favors colorful looks but doesn’t sacrifice comfort.  These are the photos attached to the article:

via the Wall Street Journal

via the Wall Street Journal

If there’s a single comfortable anything in either picture, I can’t find it.  Maybe her watch.

Also, the lady in the article is fond of the “shoetie,” a cross between a bootie and a shoe, like the shoe on the bottom right in the second picture.  “She likes that most styles have a zipper in the back of the heel, making the shoe fairly easy to slip on and off. ‘You’ve got some coverage but there’s an open-toe aspect so there is breathability.'”

I can’t think of anything worse than a shootie.

3. The Magnificat recently had this passage written by Saint Philip Neri:

To preserve our cheerfulness amid sickness and troubles is a sign of a right and good spirit.  A man should not ask tribulations of God . . . he who bears what God send him daily does not do a small thing.

I’m thinking about this today, since the girls have been puking all day, and Pat and I are feeling puny too.

I’m just going to have to leave off with three quick takes for this week.  Click over to This Ain’t the Lyceum for more.  Have a happy weekend!

Friday link love

Some serious, most not . . . .

I’m coming across news articles and little tidbits I want to discuss with you, but I never remember them. . . . Until now.  I really hope these links work.  Let me know if they don’t work.

1. This article is about a young woman who was diagnosed with autism at age 21. **The Wall Street Journal link isn’t working–here’s another article about the same person**   Because she was “high functioning,” it took until college for someone to figure out what was going on.  She describes feeling relieved at the diagnosis, because she no longer feels a need to strain to be normal.  . . . It’s a tricky thing because of course a parent does want his kid to have autism, but you want your kid to have all the resources she can. . . . AT the same time, with 1 in 68 people having autism, is it really a disorder?  Or, at higher-functioning levels is it more a personality type?  And does that distinction matter?

2.. Ann Taylor is being bought out by the company that owns DressBarn.  Weird.  I like reading the Wall Street Journal business section from time to time because it’s fun to learn what’s going on behind the scenes at stores where I shop.  (The full text of the WSJ article isn’t available online, so I’m linking to a different article.)

3. The percentage of African-Americans in law enforcement has remained flat since 2007.  With this and all the related news about the Baltimore riots, etc. etc. . . . it’s so frustrating . . . It’s like no one cares about black men until they get shot by the police.   So many black young people–males especially–are on a life course that’s fundamentally at odds with the law.  And it happens in childhood and many barely have a choice.   And all the hiring quotas and body cameras and police training and whatnot in the world isn’t going to change that.  There’s going to be a tension between young black men and the law so long as so many of them have no real lawful options in life.  Could someone out there talk about this please?

4. On a lighter note, I’m thinking a lot about moving soon and what I’ll do differently.  When I arrange and set up and decorate whatever our next house is, I’m focusing on furniture and window coverings, then rugs and wall hangings, and only after that all the knickknacks.  With the current house, I’ve constantly moved mantle decorations and pictures around, never getting the result I wanted because my curtains and furniture sucked.  . ..  Anyway, I was thinking about all this and then later that day I read a post from The Nester on the exact same point.  . . .This stuff doesn’t come naturally to me but I’m learning! . . . Still, the Nester decorates with a lot more knickknacks than I prefer.  Her pictures make me feel a little crowded.

5. A year or two ago I polled you guys about flesh-toned pantyhose.  Guess what?  They’re officially “back.” Ellen called it: Princess Kate can do no sartorial wrong.

6. I am loving, loving the Bossa Nova station on Pandora.  It’s soothing and at the same time it makes me feel like I’m in an Audrey Hepburn movie.

7. Click over to Kelly at This Ain’t the Lyceum for more quick takes.  Happy weekend!

P.S.  Girl 1 just informed me, “When I grow up I’m going to have five twins!  . . . Their names are going to be Carlos, Carlos, Peg, and Meg!”

thoughts deep and heavy, like the snow . . .

It’s 4:45 on a Friday morning, and I can’t sleep and I’m thinking about . . .

1. This phrase:

Be kind

The tricky thing is when “everyone” includes your husband and his hard battle is living with you.

2. Um, and you with him.

The oatmeal: “why working at home is both awesome and horrible” (rated R)

3. Co-parenting is hard, yo?*  Pat and I recently ‘fessed up to the fact that we each do okay with the kids on our own, and we do okay with each other without the kids, but trying to deal with the kids together drives us up the wall.

4. And in my moods where I tie life the universe and everything together metaphysically while preparing the girls’ fifth snack of the morning, I think . . . marriage and co-parenting are so hard that, no wonder people don’t do it as much, in a society where marriage isn’t required for (a) men to get sex and (b) women to have financial security and children.  At the same time, I mean, I like living at a time when I could support myself and where single mothers aren’t ostracized and marginalized.

Anyway.

5. On a related note, here’s this short article, about the role government played in the crumbling of black families, and how that fits in with the lingering spiritual ramifications of slavery.

Oh yikes, heavy.

6. This article by Dave Barry was funny: The Greatest (Party) Generation.

Dave Barry, “The Greatest (Party) Generation”

I don’t know how accurate it is, but I like his point that

We modern parents. . . rarely pause to celebrate the way our parents did because we’re too busy parenting. We never stop parenting. We are all over our kids’ lives—making sure they get whatever they want, removing obstacles from their path, solving their problems and—above all—worrying about what else will go wrong, so we can fix it for them. . . .

Yes, we’ve gotten really, really good at parenting. This is fortunate, because for some inexplicable reason a lot of our kids seem to have trouble getting a foothold in adult life, which is why so many of them are still living with us at age 37.

They’re lucky they have us around.

7. I dread errands where I have to get the kids bundled up, into the car, then out of the car into a public place with lots of havoc to be wrought, then back in the car again.  Just with two kids, it’s a pain (especially when the process throws my back out), and I love M.T.’s witty post about doing it with four: Dear Navy Federal, Get a Drive-Through.

Click back to This Ain’t the Lyceum for more Quick Takes. Thanks for hosting Kelly!

* I mean in the strictly literal sense, of parenting along with the other parent, not just where the parents are divorced or separated.

Seven Quick Takes 2.27.15

1. The girls and I listened to Kids Songs Jubilee in the van today.  I grew up listening to the Kids Songs tapes by Nancy Cassidy.  Now Girl 1 sits on the couch, reading the songs to herself and singing them.  I love hearing her sing.  And both girls listen to the tape together, singing and dancing around the living room.  Love it.

This is the only clips I can find on YouTube (speaking of which, did you know YouTube has one billion viewers but no profit?):

2. Per Kelly’s prompt, this was my first post.  Random thought off the top of my head.  Nothing much has changed.

3. My most-viewed post is Style & the Stay at Home Mom: A Quest.  By far.

4. My least-viewed post is this (no surprise).  You can read its follow-up here (oooh, exciting!).

5. This post today might end up down at the bottom of the list too, because it’s one of those days . . .

6. where I’m just . . .

7. not inspired.

Oh here’s a thought: how many years off Purgatory should I get for letting my kid “help” me paint?  I’m thinking lots and lots.

IMG_8043 IMG_8042 IMG_8040

Oh, and my new living room arrangement I showed you last week?  These are “before” shots (or a halfway-there shots).  Oh, this house . . . .

IMG_8038 IMG_8039

Click back to This Ain’t the Lyceum for something worthwhile to read.  😉  Happy weekend folks!

I’m thinking about . . .

1. The Synod.  But I haven’t read the “working document,” or whatever it is, yet.  So, I’m trying not to spout off opinions.  Not too many, anyway . . . .

2. Joannie’s post on the same topic, and especially what she says here:

[O]ver the past six years I’ve worked with a lot of people.  I’ve encountered the human heart.  Fresh out of grad school, I was armed with the Catechism and the Summa and I was ready to beat Church teaching into every soul and mind.  Now I’m still armed with those treasures, but I’m ready to propose it.  Just as God does.  I’ve encountered a weak and frail humanity that needs love and care and healing.  It needs the Truth.  But it is too wounded to be beaten further.  It needs to be loved.

3. Gradualism, as in Sr. Theresa’s story here and Caleh’s story.  Especially Caleh’s story.  It’s been in the back of my mind ever since I read it a while ago and it is so relevant now.

4. How it’s easy for me, having lived my whole life in a protected bubble of  security, to forget how much the American family has changed.  For the worse, and children are the ones who suffer the most.  This really hit home for me the one year I practiced “family” law.  What is the right approach for people who haven’t had a stable marriage in their ancestry for generations?

And how do you keep from “being so eager to bring lost sheep into the fold that we shove out the sheep already here,” leaving them to feel like suckers?  As Caleh puts it, “the Church IS for everyone…not just for those of us who happen to sin the trendy way.”

5. I think Pope Francis gets it.  He emphasized that it takes courage to marry and have a family.

It’s a bit off-topic but, I love this little anecdote:

[Pope Francis] told the story of a woman who said her son was in his 30s, had a girlfriend, but wouldn’t get married.

“I told her, ‘Ma’am, stop ironing his shirts,'” the pope said.

6.  I really like this picture, even though it reminds me of the Jehovah’s Witnesses tracts my piano teacher kept in her music room.  I don’t know where it comes from.  I can’t read the artist’s signature.  Anyone know?  It’s called “Adoration,” by David Bowman.

Jesus with little girl

Adoration, by David Bowman

7. Speaking of people who “get it.” Kelly does.  Why am in bed, using my laptop to browse blogs, when I spent the entire day looking forward to going back to sleep?  There’s a constant tension between sleep-time and me-time.

Happy weekend everyone. Click over to Jen’s for more quick takes.

7QT about lazy sangria, blogging profits, and a UD joke

1. Here’s a visual of my Thursday evening from about 6:30 onward, when Pat mercifully took over childcare and kitchen duties:

Book, Chocolate, booze

Book, stevia-sweetened dark chocolate, booze

2. It’s been a long week.  Both girls sick.  Up 1/3 of last night w/ insomnia.  Up the other 1/3 with Girl 1, who had an earache.  Blah blah blah.  My life is hard, etc.

3. Due to various reasons (see above), I resorted to Tired Woman’s Sangria this evening.  I just made it up.  It consists of the following:

  • Large drinking glass of disappointing white wine (should have stuck with Ecco Domani)
  • A few spoonfuls of diced fruit (in my case, watermelon and Granny Smith apple)
  • 2-3T Simple syrup (equal parts sugar and water, cooked together until the sugar is dissolved; I keep some on hand, made in advance)
  • Ice

Soak the wine, fruit, and syrup together and chill in the fridge for as long as you can stand to wait.  Add ice and gulp.

4. Breaking news: forget Kindle Unlimited, Oyster, etc. and just get . . . a library card.  Public libraries have a better selection of electronic books, and they’re free!  It’s in the newspaper so it must be true.  Also, I tried out Kindle Unlimited for the free trial period and was underwhelmed.

5. On a more serious note, I thought this was a good, short article about how Americans (not all of us but some of us) have caused the current influx of undocumented minors emigrating  from Central America to the U.S.

6. And back to less serious notes: I made money from this blog for the first time yesterday!!  I signed up for Amazon’s Affiliate program and made a full ten cents!  That’s right, someone clicked through from my blog and spent $2.50!  Try not to be too jealous.  I want to frame it as the first dime I made, like some businesses frame the first dollar they make.  Trouble is, Amazon won’t cut a check until I make $10.  At my current rate of 4% per click-through purchase, it’ll take . . .

0.04x = $10

x = 10/.04

x = $250

. . . $247.50 more in purchases from readers.  Keep it up folks!  😉  . . . Actually, after a few more purchases my rate goes up to a whopping 6% or something like that.  Nevertheless, I’m keeping my day job.

7.  So, inside joke for any University of Dallas people (which also applies to many small Catholic colleges): my little brother just set off for a jaunt to Ireland before his study abroad semester in Rome.   He posted some pictures of his group.

I couldn’t help but notice that, while the guys in his group are fair to middling in the looks department, the girls are  H-A-W-T, hot, hot.

“Steve-O, dude, how did you manage this?” I asked.   His reply:

“That’s the magic of the UD ratio.”

He’s a smart one, that kid.

Happy weekend folks!  Click over to Conversion Diary for more quick takes.

7 quick takes about power suits, nail polish, and double entendres

{Apologies if you’re looking for a new Style & the SAHM post.  I accidentally published it early and then removed it.  It will be back on Tuesday.}

1. Even the most successful, powerful women in the world have trouble finding clothes that suit them. That’s what I learned reading this article about the clothing line, Nina McLemore.

The line specializes in styles that are “in road-worthy luxury fabrics and styles that are never revealing” for women “who want to look sharp but not have the focus on their clothing and appearance.”  The clothes comes in feminine colors because  “femininity and color no longer signal a lack of authority.”   Still, the line “doesn’t scream brand name and doesn’t call attention to itself.”  It suits even women who “don’t all come in designer sizes, (which generally stop at size 10 or 12).”  The styles “include options for most body types, and the fabric is tested for comfort and durability.”

Unfortunately, the entire Nina McLemore line is basically one variation or another on the power suit.  Not my style at all.  And their website looks like a time capsule from 1998.

Still, it’s refreshing to read about a line that was built around real women and their needs.  Most clothes seem to be designed with 20-year old, size zero socialites in mind, leaving those with different shapes and different lifestyles out in the cold.  (Twenty-year old, size zero socialites are real women too.  You know what I mean.) At the very least, it makes me feel better about the challenges I have in finding clothes that work.  Apparently I’m in good company.

2. My front flower beds are a disgrace, particularly the one on the right. IMG_6511 IMG_6512 It’s disappointing because I put a lot of work into them over the past three years (not so much this year, when the slug life chose me).  When I created the flowerbed, I laid down newspaper over the preexisting grass and leaves and put down layers of sand and planting soil.  I guess I didn’t build the bed up high enough or something because the crabgrass has taken over completely.

I’m contemplating whether to (a) fight back or (b) pull out the paving stones and replant grass around the bushes (there are azalea bushes beneath all the weeds), or (c) put down pebbles around the bushes and just do flower planters.  I have daffodils down there that pop up every year in the early spring.  I guess I can dig them up and plant the bulbs elsewhere?

3.  Because everyone loves to talk nail polish . . .  I bought some Vinylux nail polish and used it with the Vinylux “7 day” top coat.  The top coat didn’t give me spectacular results when I used it with OPI color, but  so far so good with the polish and top coat combined.  It’s gone 24 hours without chipping, even after I took a shower.  That’s a record for me.  I wish I chose a different color, but it’s not too bad.

Vinylux "Clay Canyon"

Vinylux “Clay Canyon”

4. Some days I listen to this 11 hour recording of Tibetan singing bowls, when my nerves are frazzled. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q5dU6serXkg

Pat listened for a little while and observed,

“I like it.  It has all the benefits of wind chimes with none of the commitment.”

5. My brother, John, is a composer.  Some of his compositions are available here for streaming.  He’s written a lot over the years, but my favorite is still Nocturne, from 2008. One of the lesser-known of John’s many musical talents is playing the accordion.  We’ll see if it catches on with Girl 1.

Martha and Sebastian meet a baby chick

6. Speaking of brothers, here’s another photo from my brother Stephen, taken of my sister and her little boy. Aren’t they precious?   010d1b67e3f7bfde411f66677d4bd4c73b8d05db81

7. Question for you  . . . .  A double entendre is where you say something that, on the surface, has an innocent meaning, but can also be taken with a different, less-innocent, usually sexual meaning. What do you call it when that first-impression, surface meaning is sexual, or “naughty,” but the intended effect is to be “oh, ha ha, this is actually innocent”?  It’s like a reverse double entendre.  But what if your underage daughter is involved? What do you call that?  . . . I call it messed up.

And decorating it with this:   IMG_6509

does not make it family friendly when you also decorate with this: IMG_6508

Signing out from prude central (am I??) and linking up with Conversion Diary for 7 Quick Takes.  Happy weekend!

7 Quick Takes About Algebra, Myers-Briggs, and American Girl

1.  I ordered Roman shades for our living and dining rooms.  Finally!

I can check off one of the items on my New Year’s goal list.  My days of being depressed by my pathetic living room curtains are numbered.

Even once I saved up the money to buy the shades, I procrastinated ordering them.  Such a hassle–measuring the windows, choosing fabrics and styles.  I don’t enjoy that process much.  I just want it done but done perfectly.

And then comparison shopping between retailers.  . . . I priced Budget Blinds, Next Day blinds,the Levolor brand from Lowe’s (on sale), Bali (from Lowe’s), and the same brands from JC Penney.

Levolor from Lowe’s was the cheapest by far.  The down side is that we need to install them ourselves.  (“We” meaning Pat does the work and I stand by barking helpful hints.)  If Pat and I ever divorce, it will be because of window treatment installation.  I’m considering hiring someone to do it, so I won’t need to be diplomatic.

 

2. When was the last time you used algebra?  It was two weeks ago for me.  Our local consignment store offers you a choice between (a) paying a $6 consignor fee and then getting 50% of the sales on your stuff or (b) paying no fee and getting 40%.

Which to choose?

0.5x – 6 = 0.4x

0.5x = 0.4x +6

0.1x = 6

x= 60

Amiright amiright?

If I’m right, that means I’d have to sell $60 worth of stuff to make back my $6 fee.  I’m going with the 40/60 deal because I don’t trust our crummy consignment store to get $60 for my stuff.

 

3. Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo! made news the other day for showing up two hours late to a meeting with important potential advertisers with the company.  She made news a few years ago, when she was hired, for being the first pregnant woman to be appointed CEO of such a large company (or something like that).  She’s been in the spotlight a lot since then, especially since she has an uphill job turning Yahoo!’s fortunes around.

Anyway, reading that made me think, “What if her kid is sick?  What if she was up with him all night?”  Just thinking about her life stresses me out.

 

4. I’m feeling a bit better about my fondness for Impressionism, after reading about how a Monet water-lily painting earned top dollar at a recent auction.  I guess I share tastes with some wealthy Chinese and Russian art collectors.

 

5. Congratulations to Ellen, who is having her baby boy today!  Check out the precious nursery she put together for him.

 

6. I’m reading Please Understand Me, which is a primer on the Myers-Briggs personality types.  Funny–some of the characteristics of temperaments other than mine are things that I always considered character flaws!  There’s a certain amount of navel-gazing in poring over personality-type material, but it also goes a long way in helping me tolerate other people!

It’s also fascinating (and confusing) to ponder how much of someone’s temperament is inborn, how much is developed due to external circumstances (“nature vs. nurture”), how much is due to developmental disabilities or psychological disorders, and how much is simply individuality.

For instance, I think Girl1 is definitely ENF . . . J or P, not sure about that last letter yet.  (Girl2 is possibly an introvert–an “I” and not an “E”–I’m not sure about her other traits.  Right now she is so very two years old.  The two-ness overshadows her other traits.)

The book explains, “The NF child is not really comfortable in large groups where instruction is not individualized.”  This makes me think of Girl 1’s  soccer experience, where she had a hard time comprehending the instructions that the coach would shout out to the group.  I attributed it to a cognitional/ sensory condition, but maybe it’s just temperament.  And is there really a bright distinction?

Also, “NF children . . . may want the same story read over and over.”  I started reading Girl 1 a chapter book, Little House in the Big Woods, but we didn’t make it through.  Each time I picked it up, she wanted me to start at the beginning again.  I couldn’t help being a little concerned because, at age five, it seemed to me that she was old enough to be read chapter books.  But maybe she’s just the type who needs more repetition.

 

7. Anyone else out there remember Pleasant Company, i.e. American Girl before it sold out to Mattel?  (I just realized that all of the original dolls have been discontinued.  Sniff!)

Remember the message from Pleasant T. Rowland on the back of the catalogs?  I was fascinated that someone was named “Pleasant.”

I still have catalogs from the late 80s and early 90s stored away.  Such fond memories.  I also have a Molly doll in a box under my bed, just waiting for my girls to be old enough for her.  I’m second-guessing whether I need to save all those catalogs for posterity though.  I could make a respectable sum for them on eBay . . . .

Happy weekend everyone!  Click over to Conversion Diary for more quick takes.

 

 

 

A Movie I Hate

that I’ve never seen, advice I won’t take, plus other midnight ramblings:

 

1.  Here’s a little something for you:

Two of my favorite things: .gif images and Pride and Prejudice

2.  There are lots more of both herebut

3. I loathe the “new” Pride and Prejudice* movie with a passion.  The one with Keira Knightly.  Hate it.  Really can’t stand her acting.  Looking at her gives me the heebie geebies.  Does she have a sinus problem?  Can she not breathe through her nose?  Why can’t she close her mouth?

I don’t know her as a person so probably she’s perfectly likable in real life.  (Trying to avoid being uncharitable here . . .)  But in movies ugh.  And what little I saw of the new movie really was not true to the book.  The characters’ restraint is what makes the emotion in the book so compelling.  And the “new” movie does away with most of the restraint.  From what I saw.

Like I said I didn’t watch it.  Just a few bits and pieces.  I’m very fair and thorough that way when I form my opinions.

4. In happier news, my sister  Lizzie had her baby!  They are both doing well.  I don’t know how much more I’m allowed to tell.  Anyway, I’m pretty excited.

Speaking of younger siblings doing things one already has done . . . .

5. Advice: I used to dole out a lot of it.  I also used to think I needed to take every bit of advice that came my way.  Now, I’m pretty much done with advice.  This article quite humorously discusses the reasons why.

The U.S. is addicted to advice. Americans honestly believe that someone out there knows how to fix all our problems. . . . Why, then, are so many of us miserable, bankrupt, overweight chain smokers with horrible, illiterate kids? The advice was out there.

Certain family members might roll their eyes at my asserting I’m through with giving advice.  I guess I should say: I’ve cut back.  I’ve come a long way.

6. And speaking of . . . uh . . . kids.  Kids!  I saw this little statistic about vaccines.

Apparenly, parents who are disinclined to get their kids vaccinated are even less likely to get their kids vaccinated after being given a pro-vaccine spiel.  Makes perfect sense to me.

My kids are vaccinated (tho on a delayed schedule), but I detest the info sheets the doctor’s office hands out from the Center for Disease Control.  My friend calls them “idiot sheets,” and I think that sums it up perfectly.  “Hmm, you obviously think I’m dumber than dirt.  So what all are you not telling me?”

7. I’m always wired after book club and tonight is no exception.  Multiple hours of socializing! With multiple people at one time!  I love it but it’s a lot for my reclusive system to handle.

Happy weekend everyone!  Click over to Jen for more quick take posts.

 

*The “new” P&P was made almost nine years ago.  #Ifeelold